Tags

, , , ,

17 May 2015 – We enjoy hiking so much in Hawaii.  Sherrie chose a hike just outside Honolulu up the Kamananui Valley. The weather started warmer as we began our ascent into the valley but cooled off with a nice breeze and some passing showers.

The trail is an unimproved dirt road with remnants of the rocks and cobbles which defined the road during its almost 200 year usage.  The road was previously the access method into the various plantation sites within the valley.  The trail is wide and flat as you would expect and gains about 500 feet during its 3.5 mile length.

Kamananui Valley

Kamananui Valley

Aurelia and Lucas along the Kamananui Trail

Aurelia and Lucas along the Kamananui Trail

Sherrie, Isabella, Lucas, and Aurelia walking the Kamananui Trail

Sherrie, Isabella, Lucas, and Aurelia walking the Kamananui Trail

Sergio and Aurelia take a break along the trail

Sergio and Aurelia take a break along the trail

Only one plantation site is easily accessible off the trail.  It has a double stairway up to the main living area and a further set of stairs which lead to exterior areas of the residence.

Heading up the stairs to the plantation

Heading up the stairs to the plantation

Up the stairs to the exterior portions of the plantation

Up the stairs to the exterior portions of the plantation

Aurelia and Lucas posing at a column base at the plantation

Aurelia and Lucas posing at a column base at the plantation

The trail is also known for its bridges which cross the many streams flowing down the valley – without these bridges the road would be completely inaccessible most of the year.

Bridge over a stream along the Kamananui Valley Road

Bridge over a stream along the Kamananui Valley Road

There are other signs which illustrate the long usage of the Kamananui Valley by humans.  This includes some of the best preserved petroglyphs in Hawaii.

A petroglyph of a human within the Kamananui Valley

A petroglyph of a human within the Kamananui Valley

A petroglyph along the Kamananui Valley

A petroglyph along the Kamananui Valley

Isabella and Lucas exploring the petroglyphs

Isabella and Lucas exploring the petroglyphs

One of the most enjoyable aspects of hiking in Hawaii is the flora and fauna which abound and thrive in this climate.  Especially as it is so different from the temperate forests we are used to.

Lucas holds a milipede

Lucas holds a millipede

Isabella, Lucas, and Aurelia examine the milipede

Isabella, Lucas, and Aurelia examine the millipede

While there were not too many flowers along the trail those that were present were amazing.

A patch of Heliconia flowers

A patch of Heliconia flowers

Greenleaf Ticktrefoil

Greenleaf Ticktrefoil

Mile A Minute Vine

Mile A Minute Vine – Purple

Moonflower

Moonflower – White

Porterweed

Porterweed

Mimosa pudica var. unijuga – Sensitive Plant

Mimosa pudica var. unijuga – Sensitive Plant

Lantana camara

Lantana camara

A hillside of native Hawaiian fern

A hillside of native Hawaiian fern

Aurelia loved the spores on this plant

Aurelia loved the spores on this plant

The trail covers 9 distinct forest zones – starting the the Guava Zone.  As such the trees change significantly as you travel.

A tree arches across the trail and forms another trunk on the other size

A tree arches across the trail and forms another trunk on the other size

Aurelia in a Banyon tree

Aurelia in a Banyon tree

A Kukui nut

A Kukui nut

Aurelia, Lucas, Isabella in a tree trunk

Aurelia, Lucas, Isabella in a tree trunk

As we were leaving and a rainstorm approaching we were greeted by a rainbow over the

Rainbow over the Kamananui Valley

Rainbow over the Kamananui Valley

Advertisements